This is my Adventure

The following foreword, written by Bear Grylls for Julia Immonen’s book – Row For Freedom: Crossing an Ocean in Search of Hope – really struck a chord with me when I finally started reading it this weekend. It made me think about my life, my travels, my time here in New Zealand.

“All of us have adventure in the blood. Go back far enough into your family history and you’ll find the stories. An ancestor who left his homeland in search of a better life. A distant relative who fought against impossible odds and won. A family who took a risk and made a change.

That’s what adventure is. It’s about starting the search when we don’t know exactly what we’ll find. It’s about doing whatever it takes to make a change. It’s about saying yes to the struggle.

And it’s a part of all of us.

The question is, how big an adventure is each of us going to live?”

I’ve been pondering this; thinking about my current situation – about my journey to recovery from the darkness of depression, and about how I am doing whatever it takes to change. How despite the struggle, I am saying yes – because I’m not giving up hope of getting through this. I’ve had many adventures in my life – I’ve travelled to Europe, Asia, Africa, the Middle East, Australia and New Zealand. I’ve experienced different cultures, made friends across the world, seen amazing places and yet somehow – this seems like the biggest adventure of all. This adventure of discovering my true self. This adventure of finding what it truly means to live. This adventure of struggling through extreme darkness and knowing I can make it.

Since my last blog post I’ve continued to write, continued to explore my senses in the world around me, continued to find joy and contentment in the little things. I still have so far to go, so much to learn – and yet I feel like these small changes I’m making in my day-to-day life are making such a huge difference.

Here’s a collection of further musings – of my thoughts and feelings when I’m in the moment, reminding myself of the incredible world around me.

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I’m sitting at my desk at work and I’m starting to feel overwhelmed, starting to feel like I’m falling back into my pit of despair. And it’s so so hard to stop myself from falling again, to stop the thoughts of hurt from circling around in my head. I can’t concentrate, I can’t think straight. I’m just staring at my computer screen, not seeing what’s on it, it’s like I’m just looking into the darkness. But then I snap awake and realise that I can’t go back there again. I need to focus on what’s around me, to stop thinking horrible, terrible thoughts – to focus on the classical music I have playing to calm me – I stand up and stretch, go for a walk, breathe deeply.

And slowly I return to reality. To try and find some small things that bring me some joy in this workplace. A cup of tea. Some music. A brightly coloured Rubik’s cube on my desk. A to-do list to make everything more bearable. These small things are enough, to raise me from darkness.

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I’m standing along the waterfront in Wellington. Looking out at the beautiful pink clouds and the sky slowly changing colour as the sun sets. The sound of the water softly lapping on the rocks below me, the feel of my hair tickling me across my face, the sounds of passers-by and snippets of conversations. My heart feels full again at this moment of calm as I’m walking to climbing.

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I’m kneeling on a rock, right next to little pools of sea water. I’m watching the sea flow in and swirl around and shrink back. The simplicity and the mesmerisation of this moment. The clarity of the water, being able to see the patterns of light on the sea bed, the floating sea weed, the tiny pebbles – it’s totally clear. I feel the water, the coldness on my finger tips. The smell of the fresh sea air. The sound of the calm lapping of the waves on the rock edge, the rush and splash of water as the waves come in at speed. I see the colours – the bright white and yellow, the muted brown and orange – on the rocks. The patterns and bubbles and lines covering their surface. The sand paper texture underneath my hand.

A huge waves comes, the massive rush, the hissing of the foam, the whiteness on the surface of the clear water. I run back, but don’t quite make it, I feel the cool spray of water on my arms. Then the calm comes… momentary bliss.

This is me, this is my emotions. The sudden rush of negativity, how it builds up and crashes – spraying over me, swirling around in me. But then the calm… the quietness as I’m coming to realise my senses, immersing myself back into nature and into the joy of things around me. It’s still a process, I’m learning so much. But I’m getting there.

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The sound of nature surrounding me, the sound of a plane taking off, the sound of someone cutting down trees, the sound of cars on the road below. Looking out over Island Bay and the sea. The sky runs from blue to yellow to pink and blends with the sea on the horizon. The lush green trees on the hills, colourful houses nestled in between. I feel content, I feel euphoric at putting myself in this moment – surrounding myself with the beauty of this world, of this city. And it’s completely wonderful.

I feel happiness at where I am right this second. But I can’t help feeling the sadness, at knowing what I’ve lost and the knowledge of all the things I did wrong and could have done so differently. But I know that all I can do is change. All I can do is learn, and to truly appreciate and love the life I have been so blessed with.

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Lying on a bench in the garden on my lunch break. Listening out for all the sounds around me. Children’s shouts and laughter coming from the nursery, the hum of traffic on the road, the beeping of a horn, the buzz of an insect flying over my head, the rustle of leaves in the trees as the wind blows – how this flows from my left to my right ear as the wind goes from tree to tree. The orange light I can see on the back of my eye lids, the heat of the sun on my face, the feel of my hair tickling my face as the wind blows.

Thinking about my senses, feeling and listening, relaxing my body, forgetting my worries. Putting myself into the world around me.

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I can feel the sunlight on my face. See the bright orange underneath my eyelids. It’s like watching the sea flowing – the patterns forming, the tiny sparkles glistening, the different shades of orange. The sun almost burning its way through me. But then the cool breeze moving my hair across my face, the feeling of goose bumps forming on my skin because of the change in temperature as the sun fades. The sounds around me. Leaves rustling, wind blowing, birds chirping, cars humming along on the road behind, children playing. My eyes still closed, feeling, exploring and sensing the world around me. Holding onto these snippets of life, marking this moment into my memories.

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Watching the birds flying above me. Following one as it descends higher and higher, soaring upwards. Coming to a glide as it follows the pattern of the wind. How others join it, it’s as if they’re dancing together. In unison with each other, gliding together, following one another. The freedom of a bird, flying in the wind, over the land, looking down on us. The wind in my hair as I look up at them – how it’s almost as if I’ve joined them. I’m lost in the motion and the wonder of the freedom of flying.

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Taking myself out of my thoughts. Out of my mind. Concentrating on the life around me. The people, the buildings, the wonderful sounds of nature mixed with the raw sounds of man made existence. The cacophony of noise. But it’s so beautiful to my ears. Experiencing the motions around me, marvelling at creation, at life. Fresh wind, sea air, the incredible colours as the sun goes down on this grey day. But it’s not just grey – the different shades and patterns the clouds form as they race above me. Watching the birds soar through the air until they disappear. Forgetting my worries, the thoughts trying to entwine their wretched tendrils around me. Realising the feeling of life. Experiencing the world in a completely new way.

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It’s so windy, I hear the rumbling in my ears, the feeling of ear ache beginning. And yet… I feel so alive! Sitting on the cliff edge, looking over the beach below. The coastline of Wellington. The footprints dotting the sand, the intricate trails of so many – taking steps across this beach. My nose is running. My hands are stinging with cold. But I still don’t want to leave this spot. I’m elated, the feeling of nature’s power and beauty over me. It’s so healing, so freeing, so emotional. Looking across the ocean, the sprinkles of white on the waves, the dots of grey clouds in the wonderful blue sky. Oh the wonder, the joy of opening myself to this world. Forgetting my sorrows, feeling peace descending, renewing my soul.

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I’m standing on a beautiful tree stump on the beach. So many branches, so many twists and turns in its roots. The sound of the sea right in front of me. The sound of waves breaking, the crash and hiss on the beach. The feel of the fierce wind in my hair, the coldness and buzz in my ears, the feel of my shirt trailing behind me. The cold of my hands as I write this down, trying to remember, placing myself in this moment – immersing myself in the feel and the sounds and the cold around me. Trying to forget. The thoughts taking over my mind – trying to wash away this negativity and pain. Making myself embrace the feeling of life, of being in the here and now. Of realising that my thoughts do not control me. My thoughts, as they try to consume me, slowly wrapping their tentacles around me. There’s a better feeling than this. There’s the feeling of complete contentment at standing here on this beach on a windy day in Wellington. There’s this feeling of flying – as the wind encircles me – the feeling of freedom. Of hope and happiness and healing. I can feel the negativity unwrapping, my heart starting to beat with excitement – the feeling of amazement at myself, at this moment. Knowing I can get through this.

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A journey of self-discovery in New Zealand

It’s been just over 2 years since I first landed in New Zealand. I’ve travelled the country extensively, lived in my car, worked in Queenstown over the ski season, learned to surf in Ahipara, and I’ve called Wellington home since February last year. So many amazing memories, so many stories to tell, so much self exploration. And yet I feel like only now, after so many years, I’m truly discovering who I am.

I was first diagnosed with depression 5 years ago, and it was an extremely tough time – I was put on medication and had therapy, but perhaps I never fully recovered. Perhaps I never fully grasped how to deal with situations and circumstances. Never fully realised how to deal with emotions and feelings, how to come to terms with finally figuring out who I am.

For years I’ve struggled with Christianity – of wondering why I never felt good enough. Why I never felt God’s never-ending completely perfect love that so many of my Christian friends spoke of. Why God would create me in a way that makes me feel rejected and unwanted in the Church – something that is so important to who I am and how I was brought up. God knows our past, present and future before we do. He knows our likes and wants and desires, He knows everything about us. Every tiny little intrinsic detail, because He knitted us together in our mother’s womb. So why – I’ve asked on so many occasions – would He make me gay? For years I’ve questioned who I am in God’s eyes, not known who I was in my own skin – of wondering why I never fancied the guys, or forcing myself to think I did because that’s what was normal and accepted. Of being scared of being found out and laughed at – or told I’m inherently wrong. And it slowly destroyed me. But New Zealand has saved me. I’ve slowly been exploring myself – my sexuality, my relationship with God. And finally, I’ve come to accept myself – come to accept that I shouldn’t live in shame because of who I am – that I am a gay Christian woman and that’s completely OK. But perhaps I’m only just processing all of this hurt and pain – all these mixed emotions cascading over me – it’s like I’m slowly crawling out of this pit of despair and coming into the light.

The last few weeks have been an emotional rollercoaster, a lot has happened, a lot has changed – I’ve been in and out of hospital, been to the lowest point I’ve ever experienced. But slowly, finally, I’m noticing things – an accumulation of everything that’s been building up for years. Noticing changes and feelings, experiencing my senses in a way that seemed foreign a few months ago.

The below are a series of musings that I wrote in a spur of the moment kind of way. About my thoughts and feelings – about how I’m finally starting to experience so many conflicting emotions all at once. And how powerful and overwhelming and terrifying it all is – yet it’s all so liberating. These thoughts hopefully give an insight into the way depression numbs – and the enormity of finally beginning to feel…

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Depression is a powerful and completely exhausting illness to live with. It impacts my thinking, the way I perceive people and their perceptions of me, the way I deal with situations, the way I see myself, the way my mind overthinks and constantly worries. It makes you doubt and makes everything so horrible – it feeds you lies until you believe them. And it’s a terrible vicious cycle, because once these thoughts start, it’s hard to stop them. Everything feels so grey and impossible. It’s like I just sit there motionless and can’t turn my thinking off – the thoughts swirl around until they can’t get any worse – I almost feel like I’m in a dark tunnel and there’s no light at the end. I feel dazed and helpless. I feel like life is just so much effort, that there’s nothing bright or joyful in it. That my head struggles to be positive once I’m surrounded by all these thoughts.

But this morning, whilst all these horrible thoughts were going around to the point where I almost forgot where I was – I told myself to stop. To force myself to think of 3 positive things – no matter how small and insignificant they may seem. And I focussed on the comedy show on the radio – at the sounds of the laughter – at the feeling of happiness radiating from my speaker. And I thought about the cup of tea I wanted so badly even though it was so hard to get out of bed. And suddenly I felt my head shift. Like there was some light bursting through. It’s like I can almost feel my mind lifting itself out of despair. I begin to see where I am – begin to notice the little things around me that bring me some form of joy. And it was beautiful.

And this is what I want to feel. This is how I should feel when I think about my life. And despite today’s physical greyness outside, I feel positive. I see the beauty in the clouds on the hills opposite, I feel warm and content listening to classical music with the fire going. This is a beautiful moment. And I finally realise what it’s like to be happy. I don’t have to be doing something, I don’t have to be with people at a gig. I don’t have to feel left out or worry that people are having fun without me. I’m not thinking or caring about that. Because finally. FINALLY, I feel peace. I feel like this is OK. That this moment, by myself, is enough to feel content.

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I’m lying in my car with the door open. It’s a beautiful day – the birds are singing, the sun is shining, the sky is blue, I can hear the river rushing past down below. I’ve missed these moments in my car, waking up in nature – so far away from real life. Time to contemplate, time to think, time to appreciate life and the beauty of this world.

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Walking through the bush from the campground with my friends and we’re looking out for mushrooms and berries and flowers. And I started to feel emotional because suddenly it’s like I can see in colour. I can see the orange in the mushrooms, and the green in the grass and the trees, and the blue in the sky. It’s like these last few months everything has been so grey and dull – I can see the nature around me but I’m not totally, fully seeing it. But now, it’s like my eyes are open. I can see the colours – the brightness, the vibrancy. And it’s so emotional and so beautiful. It’s like suddenly my senses are open. My eyes can see, my ears can hear the birds and the river and Clem strumming the guitar behind me. I’m just overwhelmed with the sheer beauty of it all.

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Standing with my feet in the sea. The feel of the coldness seeping over my legs, the feel of the sand falling away under my toes as the sea comes in and falls back, the feel of the wind on my face. I’m seeing the beauty. I’m feeling the powerful impact of this earth, experiencing the motions of so many feelings slowly falling on me. I see the rain falling on the horizon, the blue skies dotted with intricate clouds overhead. I see the haze of sea spray on the beach in the distance. The reflection of the bright blue in the wet sand beside me. It’s absolutely incredible. And finally I’m noticing these details. I’m seeing and feeling the splendour of this moment. Gah! I can’t even explain the power of this. It’s like I’m flying, soaring in the skies – feeling free and completely full of emotion.

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The patterns in the sand, almost like fish scales. The hissing of the foam on the wave as the sea comes up to greet me. Watching the sea melting back into the sand as the wave retreats. The sound of the crashing and the constant hum of waves in the distance. The light spatter of rain that I feel on my face. The softness of the sand beneath my feet.

I feel complete wonder and awe at this moment of beauty on the beach. And yet my heart feels like it’s breaking, falling into the pit of my stomach.

So many emotions swirling around inside me. So many thoughts, feelings wrapped around underneath my skin. I feel like I’m flying but falling at the same time. I feel free, free from the suffocation that depression has plagued upon me for months, and the numb almost emptiness that it brings, and I’m finally feeling so much. Pain, mixed with joy. It’s overwhelmingly heartbreaking yet liberating.

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Standing on the beach in the darkness. The cold, wet sand beneath my feet. The sound of the sea in front of me. And looking up. Looking up at the beautiful night sky. Of all the tiny sparkles that are millions and millions of miles away. I can see the milky way, feel the complete awe at our existence – that there’s life on this small planet, out of all the darkness that stretches out into space. This feeling of complete amazement at the complexity and beauty of this life.

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Watching the powerful rise and fall of the sea against the cliff edge. The different shades of blue and green, deep turquoise and light azure. The foam that forms as the waves crash against the rocks. The spray that I can feel against my face – it’s almost like the sea is trying to reach me. The sounds. The smell. The feel. The colours. The mighty power of nature. It’s almost as if I’m in it, in the rising and falling waves. Because this is how I feel, so many emotions swirling around inside me – wanting to get out. To release, the rise and fall of everything that’s so joyous yet so painful. It’s so overwhelming it hurts.

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I see the stairway ahead of me, reaching up to the top of the rock overhead and it’s so full of meaning because this is what life feels like. Like I’m walking and trudging upwards, it’s so exhausting and tiring and draining, but the top is in sight. And yet it’s still so far. But when I reach it, the feeling of sheer exhilaration and freedom and liberation washes over me. Leaving the hurt and the ache of depression behind, and reaching out to a new life of wonder and awe and beauty. I sit here sobbing, alone on the cliff edge, feeling the sting of tears rolling down my cheeks. Because I’m no longer empty. I’m crying at the sheer magnificence of the New Zealand landscape before me, at the feelings of calm and peace washing over me, at the sounds of the bird song and the powerful sea below.

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These cuts on my arm, the outward expression of pain I’ve been unable to feel until now. And it hurts so damn much, all this pain soaring inside me that I can finally feel, and yet it’s so liberating.

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I’ve just finished a counselling session and I’ve walked up to a viewpoint over the city in the botanic gardens. And I’m looking out at the beauty of Wellington. Listening for the hum of traffic on the motorway, the beep of a car in the distance, the rumbling of an airplane taking off. I can see the sun shining on Mount Vic, the shadow of the cloud across the trees, the reflection of the buildings on the sea water along Oriental Parade, the grey clouds over the hills in the distance. And I can feel the warmth of the sunlight on the back of my legs, and how this slowly fades away as the clouds come. I’m putting myself in this moment. Focussing on the senses around me, realising that this is what it feels like to be alive.

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The above thoughts, so full of meaning and realisation that there’s something more – that I’m starting to experience all these feelings in a single moment. Putting myself back into this world, into this life. And I just want you all to understand, the strength that I’ve found deep within to get through this suffering – the knowledge that in the end, everything will be better, better than ever before.

Visiting Wellington? Here’s the low down on ‘must do’s’ in New Zealand’s vibrant Capital city

What’s the first thing that pops into your head when you think of Wellington?
Windy?
Small?
New Zealand’s Political hub?

Yes, Wellington is all of these things. It’s the capital city of New Zealand and is home to dozens of government departments and ministries – in fact, most people here seem to work for one. But it’s also so much more. Wellington is culturally vibrant, beautifully green and packed full of fun free things to do virtually every night of the week. Whether you’re passing through for a few days, or coming here to live for a few months or a few years – here’s the low down on what I consider ‘must do’s’ in this little but lively capital city.

Te Papa
New Zealand’s National Museum is always on the top of every tourist’s visit to Wellington, and for good reason. It’s highly interactive, loads of fun and has a plethora of interesting displays covering New Zealand’s rich history – from Maori settlement, to the European influx and the all important Waitangi treaty. If you’re visiting up until 2018 you’ll also have the chance to visit Te Papa’s brilliant exhibition to mark the centenary of WWI. Entitled ‘Gallipoli: the scale of our war’, this exhibition is harrowing yet beautiful, and tells the story of the Gallipoli campaign through those ANZAC’s who stood on Turkish soil and fought in 1914. Huge figures created by Weta only add to the experience – you can see the blood, sweat and tears, along with the pain etched across their faces. This exhibition is truly gut-wrenching and should not be missed.

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Wellington Cable Car and Botanic gardens
The Cable Car is one of Wellington’s most iconic and historic attractions. This funicular railway is over 100 years old and provides easy transportation from Lambton Quay to the top of Kelburn – a suburb on a steep hill (as is the norm in Wellington). A return ticket is pretty cheap at only $7, but I would recommend getting a single ($4) and walking back through the beautiful Botanic Garden – which also boasts some fantastic views over the city.

Sample the Craft Beer
Wellington is famous for its craft beer scene. There’s an abundance of fantastic beer bars and breweries that have a continuous turn-over of weird, interesting and delicious beers. As an avid real ale drinker back in the UK I loved trying out all the new beers on offer, and was even happier when I found out that most craft beer pubs have at least one ‘hand-pulled’ beer on tap. YES! An almost British ale! Complete with no fizz and a warmer temperature, I felt practically at home. My favourite bar has to be Rogue and Vagabond, who always have at least 10 beers on tap – which are changed weekly – and one or two hand-pulled options. I love the vibe in this bar, it’s always a great place to hang out with friends, sample a couple of beers and listen to the live music – which is always excellent and happens every Thursday – Sunday.

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Sit back, relax and have a coffee
I’m a typical Brit, I usually prefer my tea to my coffee – and at home I wouldn’t typically go out for one. (Probably because in my hometown of Reading it’s filled with Starbucks and Costas – none of which produce a good coffee.) But here in Wellington it is definitely a must. There are many great cafes dotted around the CBD – especially along Cuba Street. But my all time favourite has to be Maranui Cafe which though a bit of a trek from the city centre, is definitely worth it. The cafe is housed at the Maranui Surf Life Saving Club in Lyall Bay – situated right next to the beach. The views out to sea are stunning, the coffee is excellent and the food delicious.

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Cuba Street
Cuba Street – the cultural hub of the CBD – is packed with some amazing cafes, which are often next to hipster bars, vintage op-shops, graffiti clad walls and trilby wearing buskers. It’s the Brick Lane of Wellington so to speak – you get the picture.

Free concerts and festivals
It seems that a week doesn’t go by without something awesome and free going on in the city. A few months ago at the end of the summer it was street festival season – I went to one in Newtown and one on Cuba Street called ‘CubaDupa’. The roads were closed and instead filled with an abundance of food stalls and stages where live music blared out over the crowds all day long. It was hot, it was fun and it was ‘Absolutely Positively Wellington’. A few weeks ago there was also a jazz festival – over 100 performances crammed into 5 days. I went to 5 gigs, all of which were unique and brilliant. There are also food festivals, beer festivals, art gallery openings, live music on most nights across the city, and much more. Wellington is a city that never stops, there’s always something to do, something to see – come rain, wind or shine.

The outdoors and anything associated with ‘adventure’
Wellington is nestled between beautifully lush green hills, and the sea. You never have to walk far in the city to find nature – whether that’s a cycle or drive around the coast from Red Rocks to Miramar, or an afternoon bush walk in the town belt, or a stroll along the waterfront towards Oriental Bay, or walking up to the top of Mount Vic for fab views over Wellington– there’s always some natural beauty to be easily found in this wonderful city. There’s also surfing, biking, kayaking, rock climbing, and more… Since I’ve been here I’ve joined the amazing meetup group ‘Adventure Wellington’ who plan a variety of ‘adventurous’ events, and it’s also a great place to make friends. I go climbing and do interval training weekly, I’ve also been to adrenaline forest (like go-ape but tougher!), paintballing and trampolining – I truly am embracing the Kiwi lifestyle!

Wellington is a mesmerising city – it’s vibrant, beautiful and it constantly surprises me. There’s always something going on, to the point where I sometimes struggle to find a night to chill and do nothing! I’ve lived here since February and had a complete blast – and made some pretty awesome friends too. It’s only two weeks now* until I leave to head back down to Queenstown for some winter ski fun, and to be honest, I’m now beginning to wonder whether this is the right decision. Wellington gets under your skin, it draws you in and makes it hard to leave. No wonder so many Kiwi’s are proud to call it home.

*Edit. I wrote this a few weeks ago. I’ve now left and am on the South Island – road-trippin back to Queenstown.

Making friends abroad – the sad side to life downunder

Is travel as great as it sounds?

I’ve spent the last year in New Zealand living a pretty nomadic life. Six months in Queenstown interspersed with travel around the whole country – plus five weeks in Ahipara. And whilst it’s truly been a dream to travel around this stunningly beautiful country – to live out of my car and camp in remote yet stunning places – it begins to get tiring and lonely after an extended period of time.

Since I left home in January 2015 my friendships have been somewhat fluid and never stable. While this way of life may work for some – especially those younger than myself – you begin to miss those friends you’ve left behind who you can talk to about anything, have a laugh with about everything and who will always be there for you.

I shouldn’t complain. I’m travelling and that means that your friends will go as rapidly as they enter your life. And don’t get me wrong, I’ve made some fabulous life-long friends from my many trips around the world. But, it’s like I suddenly hit a brick wall and realised… I’m too tired for this.

It was easy enough making friends in Queenstown – practically everyone is new for the ski season, everyone wants to make friends and it seems that you instantly know a bunch of people to party with and ski with. Whether they’re from your hostel, house, work or shared lifts up the mountain. It’s easy. But, these friendships are almost always temporary and rarely meaningful.

So I began to rely heavily on my friends and family back home. Through endless chats on whatsapp and facebook messenger, and the occasional skype session. It’s hard when those closest to you are 11-13 hours behind, so you can only realistically chat morning or evening – but when it’s the middle of the day and you just want to chat to your best friend – and you can’t. That’s when it sucks the most. As much as I crave being on the road and seeing the world – I began to crave stability and solid friendships more. And so I decided to settle in Wellington for the foreseeable future.

The sad reality of making friends in a new city

Wellington is a fantastic city. There’s so much going on, from comedy and live music to street festivals and amazing craft beer – not only is it ‘hip’ but it’s surrounded by the sea and lush green hills – it’s just absolutely beautiful. I love living here, I’ve got a good job, a nice house in a cool area of town, and I’m getting out and about – doing new things, meeting people and having fun. But, despite this, it’s still flipping hard to make friends.

Back in the UK I’ve been very lucky to have been blessed with some fantastic friendships. Even after I moved back to my hometown after living in Nottingham for 5 years, I had a solid group of new friends after a couple of months. I’ve never struggled with making good friends, until now.

Perhaps I’ve forgotten how to form normal friendships because I’ve been on the move for so long.
Perhaps I expect too much too soon and ultimately push people away – stemming from the ‘instant travel friend syndrome’.
Perhaps I’m overly friendly which comes across as ‘clingy’ – which maybe stems from my Christian background.
Perhaps people simply don’t want to be friends with someone who they don’t think will be around for long.

It could be a variety of reasons. Is it me? Is it them? Or is it to do with the society we have become.

Let’s face it. Our society has become so engrossed with social media, texting, Tinder, and other online activities that we’ve forgotten how to interact in the real world. Friendships have become disposable. Communication has become lazy. And too often we forget that the people we chat to via text are real people too. It’s become easy to drop people by just slowly cutting them out of our lives. Despite instant communication it seems to have become harder to pin people down and to hang out in the flesh – it’s become easy to cancel, to simply avoid contact by not responding to messages, and to flake out when we get a better offer. Gone are the days of planned regular hang-outs because we can simply ‘text to arrange something’, but then never do. We live ‘online’ lives even more than our real ones – we’d rather sit on our phones than meet someone in person. Is this why I’m finding it so hard – are people not bothered anymore?

I am a self confessed text-a-holic. I guess it’s my main way of staying in touch with my best friends who are miles away from me – it’s just become the norm for developing and keeping these friendships. And maybe this way of contact has overlapped into the friendships I’m attempting to build in Wellington – and having a detrimental effect. As a friend I like to check in on people to see how they’re doing – especially if I haven’t seen them in a while. I enjoy having a little chat via text, a little banter here and there. But so often our words can be misconstrued, or we may say too little, or too much – we may seem needy, or clingy, or desperate. We shouldn’t have to overthink what we say to prospective friends, in fear that we’ll scare them off. But then we shouldn’t feel like we have to respond to someone, or get upset when someone doesn’t. Texting is a wonderful way of keeping in touch, but it also dehumanises us and has a detrimental effect on furthering blossoming friendships. Stop texting, pick up the phone, or even better – meet over a drink or dinner to catch up properly. That’s the best way to forge relationships.

It’s the sad reality of suddenly realising you’re in your late 20s, that you’re 12,000 miles from home and you don’t have a solid group of friends close by to talk to and hang out with. Perhaps panic mode has set in – I’m realising how alone I am after spending more than a year away from home. And I desperately crave close friendships – but it’s just much, much harder than I ever anticipated, and have ever experienced.

It’s not as if I’m not going out of my way to meet people – I do regular weekly activities, I go to social events, meet up with already present friends – I meet loads of people, and yet it seems I have some problem moving from ‘person I hang out with a couple of times’, to ‘friend’. Friendship is a two-way street after all, but so often it doesn’t feel that way. Maybe it’s just me, maybe it’s a wider problem – maybe as a society we need to collectively rethink our treatment of others and start to treat people with more respect. I can’t answer that. But what I do know, is that making friends is never easy.

Five weeks enjoying ‘Endless Summer’

Endless Summer is a beautiful hostel situated in Ahipara, the Far North, right next to the ninety-mile beach. The owners, Anna and Blain, are a super friendly couple who have run the lodge for 14 years.

The first thing you notice about ‘Endless Summer’ is the beauty of the building. Built in 1870 from just one Kaori tree, the lodge is old for New Zealand standards. The building fell into disrepair for many years, until it was bought by a builder who completely renovated the place. It then passed onto Anna and Blaine who have lovingly created a fantastic high-end backpackers – somewhere to spend a few days at the end of your long trip around New Zealand, or to simply retreat and enjoy some peace and quiet away from your busy NZ life.

I spent 5 weeks working for accommodation at the hostel – and I wish I could’ve spent longer. For two and a half hours every morning I cleaned the three downstairs bathrooms, the kitchen, the lounge and the dormitory – in exchange for free accommodation and FREE surf hire. Afternoons were spent chilling in the hammocks outside, swimming in the clear blue waters at the ninety-mile beach over the road, or surfing along the coastline.

Anna and Blaine have created something truly special here. The hostel feels like a home-from-home – it’s comfortable, the facilities are excellent and the staff even better! There’s no TV so this encourages the guests to socialise around the large table in the courtyard at the back, there are numerous puzzles and games for those days when it does rain, and you can enjoy the spectacular ocean views from a hammock or deck chair in the large front garden – a mere 20 second walk to the sea. There’s also an abundance of activities to participate in (if you haven’t come to simply relax!):

  • Cape Reinga (the most northern tip of New Zealand) is a mere hour and a half drive – some guests do self-drive, however there’s an excellent tour that costs only $55 pp. This means you get to drive on the beach, and it also includes lunch – I didn’t hear a bad thing about this tour! My parents even did it when they stayed at the lodge.
  • Sand boarding – take your free board from the hostel and walk around the coastline to the sand dunes there, or drive up towards Cape Reinga and try out the huge dunes there. It’s such good fun to glide down a huge sandy hill on the board – albeit hot and sandy! You’ll likely only do this once or twice, because the climb up is a bit of a challenge… especially in the heat.
  • Short walks around the rugged and rocky coastline (only at low tide) where you can find pristine beaches and sand dunes. Or walk along the beach towards shipwreck bay (the ‘shipwreck’ is simply a rusty pole in the ground), or up the hill to the viewpoint behind the hostel – with magnificent views of Ahipara and the beautiful northland coastline.
  • Surfing – the hostel offers guest specials for surfboard and wetsuit hire. $50 for 5 days, or $20 for one – complete bargain! There’s an abundance of places to go and surf, from beginner to expert. Try further afield (strap the boards to the roof of your car) or just across the road at the beach opposite is also fantastic for beginners.
  • Tuatua and mussel ‘foraging’ along the ninety mile beach. At low tide you can pluck mussels from the rocks, or if you’re feeling even more ‘adventurous’ try your hand at digging for tuatuas – you stick your heal in the sand and wiggle it around to form a hole, then if you’re lucky you can come across loads of these shelled delicacies. SPOILER – you can get VERY wet.
  • Star gazing – the sky here is so clear and so bright, you can see the milky way on most nights. It’s awe-inspiring to just lie on the beach and look up at the night sky.
  • There’s also horseriding, quad biking, body boarding and many more activities to keep yourself preoccupied…

Endless Summer is a truly magical place. Relax with a book, explore the coastline, try out surfing or simply make some brilliant friends and share a beer or two under the stars. I urge you to stay at this place – you honestly won’t regret a second.

Christmas in Wellington

As my parents abandoned me just before Christmas, I was initially looking forward to a rather bleak one all by myself in my car in some camp ground in the middle of nowhere. FUN! But my amazing friend Jess rescued me from this grim prospect and so I was invited to spend Christmas with her, and her husband’s family in Wellington.

Christmas in New Zealand is rather strange. For one, it’s HOT – this means no wrapping up warm and rushing into the nearest shop playing festive music, or enjoying a gluhwein after a candle-lit carol service, or sitting by the fire in a small pub in the countryside – yes, this is actually what my Christmases are usually like. Alternatively, Kiwi’s enjoy BBQ’s on the beach, a cold beer on the sun deck, and enjoying Cliff Richard’s finest Christmas tune whilst wondering around in your ‘jandals’ and ‘togs’. It’s just… weird. And it doesn’t feel like Christmas.  There’s none of the hype, there’s limited decorations and of course, there aren’t any Yorkshire puddings to go with your traditional roast dinner.

It actually felt more Christmassy in Queenstown! Naturally, over the winter we celebrated ‘Christmas in July’, along with the whole of the town and the ski fields. Christmas trees were put up for the occasion, the town was covered in lights and the mountain staff wore their best Christmas jumpers. In my house we enjoyed a traditional roast dinner – with ALL the trimmings – and we participated in a house ‘Secret Santa’. It was cold, there was snow and we had a fire. Nuff said.

Having said that, Christmas in Wellington – where we enjoyed beautifully long hot and sunny days (which I’m told isn’t the norm) for the period, was a unique and unforgettable experience. I wore my palm tree shirt, I went for a dip in the (admittedly VERY cold) ocean, and partook in the classic Kiwi BBQ. Christmas with the Wilsons was different, but fantastic.

Mum & Dad hit up NZ

My parents had been meaning to visit New Zealand for years. They’ve been talking about it… but never got their butts in gear and did something about it. But when I decided to come out here, they finally got their act together to visit this fabulous country, and also, of course, their darling daughter.

I spent around 6 weeks travelling around the North and South Islands with them, staying in some amazing (and some not so amazing…) hostels, visiting places that I hadn’t yet been to, and just having a fantastic time being back with my nearest and dearest.

Photo Gallery of the North Island

Some highlights from our trip together include;

  • Riding on the ‘Driving Creek Railway’ in Coromandel Town. In essence, this is a mini railway line built by Barry Brickell over the period of 40 years – the line goes up a hill through the bush, with spectacular views at the top.
  • Driving round the East Coast – exploring the wildest areas of New Zealand. Where Captain Cook first disembarked on NZ soil, the isolated Maori communities, and the largely desolate areas of Tokamaru Bay and Tolaga – the latter is famous for housing New Zealand’s longest wharf.
  • Stepping back in time in Napier – where the whole town was rebuilt in the 1930s Art Deco after a big earthquake.
  • Walking the 19.4km Tongariro crossing on a beautifully sunny day.
  • Spending a day walking the Abel Tasman track – discovering pristine sandy beaches and beautiful views along the way.
  • Flying sky high in a helicopter over the glaciers and Mount Cook in the Southern Alps.
  • Showing them around my former Queenstown home and taking them for a delicious meal at Britannia – my former workplace and fantastic restaurant.
  • A trip on the Earnslaw in Queenstown – learning about the farm and enjoying a yummy afternoon tea overlooking Lake Wakatipu.
  • Walking around the foot of Mount Cook in Mount Cook National Park – unfortunately the peak was covered in clouds, but the beauty of the place is breathtaking regardless.
  • The beautiful carpet of Lupins near Lake Tekapo.
  • Numerous Mummy cuddles that will hopefully last me until I next see them…

Photo Gallery of the South Island

Roadtrippin’ New Zealand with the parents was a truly fantastic (though sometimes stressful) experience; it was great to see them again and to explore this wonderful country that has been my home for the last year. I think Mum hopes I settle here so she can enjoy back to back summers…

A winter spent in Queenstown

The anniversary of my year in New Zealand has just been and gone, and I have so many stories to tell, so many pictures to share… and yet I’m doing a terrible job at doing just that.

The following few posts are a quick run-through of what I’ve been up to over the last 9 months.

QUEENSTOWN

Queenstown and the Remarkables from the Skyline

Queenstown and the Remarkables from the Skyline

Spending 6 glorious months (May – Nov 2015) in this beautifully compact town in New Zealand was a truly fantastic experience. The following is a typical day in the life of a Queenstown ski bum:

10am  – Head up the mountain
11am  – Ski/ board all day
5pm   – Head to work, free dinner
10pm – Finish work, free beer
11pm  – Head out on the lash

REPEAT.

BUT… THIS. IS. NOT. REALITY.

Snowboarding!

Snowboarding!

Sometimes I can’t believe this was my life for the whole of the ski season. It was great, I had SO much ski time it was ridiculous. But perhaps my wallet, and my liver were a little sore by the end of my time in Queenstown.

And. It’s FLIPPING TINY.

In Queenstown you’re surrounded by absolutely stunning scenery, the air is fresh and the ski bum life is fantastic – for a time. Once the snow goes, there isn’t a whole lot to do… other than frequent the many amazing bars in town.

And, there are some downsides to living in such a unique place:

  • If you want to go out for the day somewhere, your options are limited. ‘Ummm… shall we go to Wanaka again?’
  • If you want to do something fun – make sure you have A LOT of money in the bank to pay for the astronomically overpriced tourist attractions in town.
  • If you want a decent and warm house – be prepared to pay FAR TOO MUCH for a bed, and not even your own room.
  • And. If you want a job at the beginning of the ski season… Well. PERSISTANCE IS KEY.

Don’t get me wrong, skiing and boarding EVERY DAY was fantastic, I loved my job, my manager and the staff there, I had some brilliant friends, I lived in an ‘OK’ house, and I relished the whole QT lifestyle for a time. And I had every intention of going back after my parents visited… UNTIL I LEFT and realised that QT is a bubble… and it’s just too claustrophobic for me.

But I’ll leave you with some photos… Yep. I lived in this beautiful place.

Jealous much?

From Picton to Queenstown down the West Coast

South Island Route

After a 3 and a half hour boat journey from Wellington to Picton – despite the cancellations because of weather warnings, the crossing was beautifully calm with blue skies and stunning scenery – I arrived safely on New Zealand’s South Island. And so began my journey down to Queenstown.

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Rather than describe my trip thoroughly (which is rather difficult now 4 months down the line), here’s a selection of highlights from my drive down the West Coast.

  • Dining on freshly caught pan fried blue cod whilst camping right by the sea at the remote French Pass campsite in the heart of the Marlborough sounds.
  • Driving along the meandering and beautiful road in the Abel Tasman National Park and spending a freezing night camped in the heart of the park.
  • Picking up a hitch hiker and heading all the way to Cape Farewell – wondering along the stunning beach; watching young seals play with each other less than a foot away; and camping in a free spot with breathtaking scenery, a campfire, and sharing beers with a stranger.
  • Visiting the abandoned coal mining town of Denniston – which was situated high on a plateau. All that remains is rubble, tracks and old coal mine carts – it’s a fascinating reminder of what was once the thriving gold and coal mining west coast.
  • Stopping at various towns that were once home to thousands of people who hoped to make their fortune from gold mining.
  • Driving along the dramatic (albeit rainy) coastline.
  • Setting up camp in my car at various free DOC campsites dotted along the coast.
  • Marvelling at the Punakaiki rocks – often referred to as the ‘Pancake rocks’ as they look like stacked pancakes. When waves come the sea tunnels through blow holes in the rocks.
  • Driving through the mountains on the scenic Arthur’s Pass road.
  • Walking to the base of the Fox and Franz Josef glaciers in the pouring rain and not being able to see a thing…
  • Sitting by the stunningly calm waters of Lake Matheson and depicting the reflections of Mount Cook in the water.
  • Visiting beautiful Wanaka in the Autumnal rain.

I saw some incredible sites, met some fantastic people and had a blast exploring some of New Zealand before settling in Queenstown for the busy winter season months.

Windy Wellington

I realise I’ve become a little tardy in updating my blog – that’s what travelling does! Yes I was in Wellington a couple of weeks ago now, but it’s never too late to post about it.

After a rushed drive from Hamilton (where I stayed overnight with a friend I met in Jordan) to Wellington – I drove the lot in a day – I arrived in Wellington tired and hungry. It was lovely to be welcomed by familiar faces (Jess and Jeremy had travelled down to visit his parents) and to have some yummy dinner saved for me 🙂

I decided to drive from Hamilton to Wellington in a day because the weather was completely AWFUL. My views of the stunning Lake Taupo were grey, misty and drizzly. Although I did make time to explore some of the hot springs in Rotorua and enjoy a free dip in a hot spring pool! In the end it was much better to drive all the way to a place I was guaranteed a proper bed and friends for the night – rather than a damp and soggy one in my car! And plus, I’ll definitely be visiting these places again some day – and hopefully then I’ll be able to see them!

Wellington is a fabulous and trendy city with quirky coffee shops and loads of things to do on a wet or very windy day. Te Papa, the national museum, houses fantastic exhibitions on New Zealand, Maori and natural history. You can read the Waitangi Treaty and learn about the frictions it caused, view a colossal (and decaying) squid, and explore the beginnings of immigration to New Zealand with the first British and European settlers. There’s also a very interesting new exhibition all about the 75 years of Air New Zealand. In a nutshell, this museum it well worth a visit, you can easily while away half a day exploring the 4 floors – and it’s completely free!

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Another ‘must-do’ whilst in Wellington is ride the Wellington Cable Car (or funicular as I know it) – a leisurely 5 minute ride that takes you up 120 metres to a botanic garden overlooking the city. Instead of paying for a return, I paid the $4 trip up and walked back to the city through the beautiful garden. This was a fascinating walk through various trees, flowers and also cemeteries that house the remains of the first settlers.

Mount Victoria is also worth climbing or driving up for stunning 360° views over Wellington. It was rather windy and cloudy when I went up but still enjoyed great views! Here’s a picture of Jess and I on the summit;

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Whilst I was in Wellington the weather wasn’t great, there was rain, wind and very choppy seas – my boat to Picton was cancelled and then delayed – but I finally made it 2 days later than originally planned. But no matter, I was staying with an amazing family (parents of Jess’s husband) who were more than happy to have me. I cherished the time sitting in the dining room overlooking Island Bay, whilst catching up on some blog posts and editing pictures! And evenings spent by the fire watching The Good Life – what bliss! I am very, very thankful for the friend I have in Jess and the amazing people I’ve met through her – it’s simply fantastic to have connections in countries so far away from home!

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The couple I stayed with took me on a day trip to Castle Rock – a beautiful 3 hour drive to the East Coast. It was incredibly windy walking up to the lookout over the bay, but the perilous walk up was rewarded with stunning views of the lighthouse and surrounding areas.

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Such a fantastic day to an incredible place. The wind was like nothing I’ve ever experienced though – at one point when walking up to the lighthouse, I was holding on so tight to the railing and could barely move for fear of falling into the roaring sea below!

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And so my stay on the North Island (for now) came to an end – I feel so blessed to have stayed with some great people and to have felt a part of a Kiwi family for a few weeks. The North Island is full of surprises, there’s great scenery, fantastic beaches and friendly people, and I can’t wait to come back. But for now… it’s onto the South!